Woman Fish Vendor Calls for Help

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A popular hotspot fish market, Maromaro fish market, opposite the Panatina plaza was also destroyed by the Tropical Cyclone Harold early yesterday morning.

BY TAVAKE SIMON HANA’AROA

AS the country is preparing to fight off the COVID-19 from entering the country, some are struggling to recover from a horrific incident they have been through caused by the category one Tropical Cyclone Harold which swept parts of Guadalcanal and causing damages to properties along the Honiara coastline.

A popular hotspot fish market, Maromaro fish market, opposite the Panatina plaza was also destroyed by the Tropical Cyclone Harold early yesterday morning. Three makeshift shelters including the market were tremendously pounded by huge waves, about 7 feet in height, living nothing but debris of timbers, few belongings and bits and pieces of broken canoes, only the market’s skeleton remain standing with few roofing irons attached, but it has to be supported with ropes, tied to the nearby Billboard post to support it from fall over.

The market custodian and fish vendor, Margret Osia told Sunday Isles of the tragic situation she went through. She lost her entire house to the Tropical Cyclone Harold.

“It was around 5 am this morning (Friday 3rd April) after done cooking my donuts when I heard the waves breaking in.

“I can tell how strong the waves were so I rush outside to save some of my belongings, but while outside I realize my house is gone,” emotional Margret said.

When asked where she would go since her home has destroyed, Osia said she would go and live with her relatives for now. She, however, pleaded to authorities and the National Disaster Management Organization (NDMO) assistance as she lost almost her entire house.

“The fish market is what that supports the livelihoods for me and my kids, but now everything’s gone. “But I thank God none of us is hurt, she said.

She continued; “My only request is for the Disaster Management to assist me with whatever that is necessary at the moment as you can see, little that I have is now gone.

“Things like cooking utensils, clothes are what we urgently in need of right now,” she pleaded.

Margret Osia is among ten to fifteen people living in that shoreline and their main income is through selling fish at the fish market. Though No causalities and injury during the incident, this will have a huge impact on their livelihoods, as their means of survival and getting income for their families has been interrupted and spoiled by Tropical Cyclone Harold.